Medical University Of South Carolina

  • CTSA Program Hub
    Medical University of South Carolina
  • Networks
    SIREN Logo
    Strategies to Innovate EmeRgENcy Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN)
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Rami Zebian, chief medical officer of the MUSC Health Florence and Marion Medical Centers
    With the help of SCTR, MUSC Health expands COVID-19 trials to regional hospitals in South Carolina
  • The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, good or bad, of two doses of TCZ in combination with standard of care treatment on subjects with moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia. This study is testing a drug called tocilizumab (TCZ). During this study, you will be hospitalized and have study procedures daily until discharged (based on your study doctor's decision). After you are discharged from the hospital, you are encouraged to come back for additional assessments; if it is not possible, you may be followed up by telephone by your study doctor or study nurse.
    About 100 people will take part in this study in the United States.

    SAFETY, AND EFFICACY OF 8 mg/kg OR 4 mg/kg INTRAVENOUS TOCILIZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH MODERATE TO SEVERE COVID-19 PNEUMONIA
    Target Population
    Hospitalized adults with evidence of pneumonia
    Primary Investigator
    Contact Email
    Sponsor
    Study Type
    Treatments and Interventions
    Clinicaltrials.gov Status
    Submitted to clinicaltrials.gov
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier
    NCT04363736
    Current Study Status
    Recruiting
    Current Study Phase
    Phase 2
    Clinical Trial Network Utilization
    No
    Accrual Target Number
    100
    CTSA Support
    Not Sure
    Locations
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Patrick Flume is heading up an effort to develop a biorepository of COVID-19 samples. Photo by Sarah Pack
    MUSC prepares biorepository of COVID-19 samples for research
  • People who recover from COVID-19 do so, at least in part, because their blood contains substances called antibodies, which are capable of fighting the virus that causes the illness. It turns out that for some other diseases caused by respiratory viruses, giving people the liquid portion of blood, called plasma, obtained from those who have recovered from the virus, leads to more rapid improvement of the disease. This study hopes to investigate if patients with COVID-19 improve faster if they receive plasma from those who have recovered from COVID-19.

    Do patients with COVID-19 improve faster if they receive plasma from those who have recovered from COVID-19
    Target Population
    Patients with severe or life-threatening manifestations of COVID-19, or documented to be at high risk of developing such manifestations
    Primary Investigator
    Contact Email
    Study Type
    Treatments and Interventions
    Clinicaltrials.gov Status
    Submitted to clinicaltrials.gov
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier
    NCT04338360
    Current Study Status
    Recruiting
    Current Study Phase
    N/A
    Clinical Trial Network Utilization
    Not Sure
    Accrual Target Number
    20
    CTSA Support
    Yes
    Locations
    Mayo Clinic
  • This is a blinded, multicenter, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. In this trial, the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults hospitalized with COVID-19 will be evaluated. In this study, a medication called hydroxychloroquine is being investigated to see if it improves recovery from COVID-19 in patients admitted to the hospital. Hydroxychloroquine is used to treat malaria and some joint (rheumatologic) diseases, but it is unknown if it helps patients recover from COVID-19. Study medication will be given for 5 days. This medication could be either hydroxychloroquine or placebo. There will be up to 510 patients in the study at about 50 hospitals in the United States.

    Evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults hospitalized with COVID-19
    Target Population
    adults hospitalized with COVID-19
    Primary Investigator
    Contact Email
    Study Type
    Treatments and Interventions
    Clinicaltrials.gov Status
    Submitted to clinicaltrials.gov
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier
    NCT04332991
    Current Study Status
    Recruiting
    Current Study Phase
    Phase 2 - Phase 3
    Clinical Trial Network Utilization
    Yes
    Petal
    Accrual Target Number
    510
    CTSA Support
    Yes
    Locations
    Petal Network
  • The purpose of this study is to estimate the extent to which health care workers at MUSC who may have higher than average risk for exposure to the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes an illness referred to as COVID-19, may have developed immunity to infection. Two groups of people will be asked to participate in this study. The first group is comprised of health care workers with a potentially higher risk of exposure who may have provided direct care or services for persons with SARS-CoV-2 infection as part of their work duties. The second group is comprised of employees whose job duties do not involve direct contact with patients. The purpose of the research is to determine if a certain marker in blood, IgG to SARS-CoV-2, can tell if participants may have been exposed to and now recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection and how seroprevalence changes over time during the current outbreak in this population of study subjects.

    Have health care workers whose job duties occur in settings that pose a higher than average risk for exposure to the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 developed immunity to infection?
    Target Population
    MUSC health care workers and employees
    Primary Investigator
    Contact Email
    Study Type
    Treatments and Interventions
    Clinicaltrials.gov Status
    Pre-clinicaltrials.gov
    Current Study Status
    Recruiting
    Current Study Phase
    Not a Clinical Trial
    Clinical Trial Network Utilization
    No
    Accrual Target Number
    440
    CTSA Support
    Yes
    Locations
  • Consortium News
    Image representing research in the time of COVID-19.
    Clinical research in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Consortium News
    David McSwain shows how a telehealth cart works
    Telehealth’s Impact on the COVID-19 Response
  • Resource
    Test Current Entries screen for the MUSC Self-Monitor v1.0
    Extending CTSA Tools to Facilitate COVID-19 Home Monitoring
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Teresa Kelechi, associate dean for research in the MUSC College of Nursing
    Despite best intentions, researchers don’t always share findings with study participants
  • Educational Content
    ReGARDD
    Regulatory Guidance for Academic Research of Drugs and Devices (ReGARDD)
    University Of North Carolina Chapel Hill
    Duke University
    Wake Forest University Health Sciences
    Medical University Of South Carolina
  • Opportunity

    Prospective Reimbursement Analysis (PRA) Manager - MUSC Office of Clinical Research

    Employer/Host
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Samar Hammad of the Medical University of South Carolina
    Could sphingolipids help solve a racial paradox in heart disease?
  • Consortium News
    Veterans learning the art of surfing with help from Warrior Surf instructors and wellness coaches.
    Surf therapy helps veterans heal
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Leslie Lenert and Royce Sampson of the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Institute at the Medical University of South Carolina
    SCTR team tapped to build a prototype of a hybrid cloud-based metrics-tracking and resource-discovery tool
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Leslie Lenert and Dr. Jenna McCauley of the Medical University of South Carolina
    Enhanced informatics tool could help researchers react more nimbly to the opioid epidemic
  • Consortium News
    Dr. Rochelle Hanson (front) and Dr. Aubrey Dueweke (back) of the Medical University of South Carolina
    Teaming Up to Improve Pediatric Trauma Care
  • Consortium News
    National Telehealth Research Symposium
    National Telehealth Research Symposium
  • Poster

    South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research (SCTR) Institute: Optional Cores- Bridging Discovery to Practice

    Medical University Of South Carolina