Neurocognitive Decline in Young Adults with Mild COVID-19: Grounding Assessment in Pre-pandemic Data

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Excess cognitive dysfunction has been identified in older adult survivors of COVID-19, compared to other respiratory infections. SARS-CoV-2 may thus adversely impact the brain beyond what the cases of acute stroke, etc. suggest. Unrecognized brain effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection may impact current brain functioning and presage future neurodegeneration and overt neurologic dysfunction. However, absent known baseline functioning, detection of subclinical effects will be confounded by normal variation between cases and controls. This talk will present our approach, which leverages detailed pre-pandemic neurocognitive and imaging assessments to characterize subclinical effects on brain structure and function among a large cohort of younger patients who experienced mild or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Michael L Lipton MD PhD FACR
Dr. Lipton, a neuroradiologist and neuroscientist, is Professor in the Gruss
Magnetic Resonance Research Center, Department of Radiology at Albert
Einstein College of Medicine as well as Medical Director of MRI Services at its
University Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center, both in New York. He divides his
professional time between the clinical practice of neuroradiology, teaching and
research. Dr. Lipton’s translational research broadly seeks to characterize brain
mechanisms linking environmental exposures to brain dysfunction and to
understand how these relationships are modified by individual characteristics,
such as sex and genes. His research program currently applies MRI to
characterize brain microstructure and function in the contexts of repeated head
impacts in sports as well as SARS-CoV-2 infection and aging. Dr. Lipton’s work
on the impact of “heading” on brain structure and function in amateur soccer
players, funded by the Dana Foundation and the National Institutes of Health,
has received extensive worldwide scientific and lay-press attention.

Date
- Add to Calendar 2022-12-09 12:00:00 2022-12-09 13:00:00 Neurocognitive Decline in Young Adults with Mild COVID-19: Grounding Assessment in Pre-pandemic Data Watch here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjKYj5Nx4zo

Excess cognitive dysfunction has been identified in older adult survivors of COVID-19, compared to other respiratory infections. SARS-CoV-2 may thus adversely impact the brain beyond what the cases of acute stroke, etc. suggest. Unrecognized brain effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection may impact current brain functioning and presage future neurodegeneration and overt neurologic dysfunction. However, absent known baseline functioning, detection of subclinical effects will be confounded by normal variation between cases and controls. This talk will present our approach, which leverages detailed pre-pandemic neurocognitive and imaging assessments to characterize subclinical effects on brain structure and function among a large cohort of younger patients who experienced mild or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Michael L Lipton MD PhD FACR
Dr. Lipton, a neuroradiologist and neuroscientist, is Professor in the Gruss
Magnetic Resonance Research Center, Department of Radiology at Albert
Einstein College of Medicine as well as Medical Director of MRI Services at its
University Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center, both in New York. He divides his
professional time between the clinical practice of neuroradiology, teaching and
research. Dr. Lipton’s translational research broadly seeks to characterize brain
mechanisms linking environmental exposures to brain dysfunction and to
understand how these relationships are modified by individual characteristics,
such as sex and genes. His research program currently applies MRI to
characterize brain microstructure and function in the contexts of repeated head
impacts in sports as well as SARS-CoV-2 infection and aging. Dr. Lipton’s work
on the impact of “heading” on brain structure and function in amateur soccer
players, funded by the Dana Foundation and the National Institutes of Health,
has received extensive worldwide scientific and lay-press attention.

https://clic-ctsa.org/events/neurocognitive-decline-young-adults-mild-covid-19-grounding-assessment-pre-pandemic-data University of Virginia admin@clic-ctsa.org America/New_York public
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Online